9/12/17

Let's dance again
















These last weeks, I did a little experience. I added links of 2 file hosting servers  that do not need accounts, leading to the last Buzzcocks singles that I posted and waited to see if they would stay alive and functional. It seems one of them is fast to dl and enduring. So, I'll give a try again and substitute new links of the one I chose to the dead M ones. Of course I'll do it at my own pace but it could be faster than I feared. Moreover, I won't repost all the re-up material so it's up to you in the further weeks to have a look whether the stuff you want has been re-up or not. I'll write a little coded sentence before the link so that you known whether it is a re-up link or not. Please write in comment if you have any problem with this new filehost so that I don't work too much for nothing. If you want to know which one it is click on the link here.  Meanwhile, let's dance and stay in alert. Thanx again to all those among you that left a comment. It's one of the main reason I want to unbury it and not let it die.

8/23/17

The end ... of Forgotten Songs

Mega has decided to close my account (on which I uploaded all the material from this blog) due to the classic violation authors' rights. They received 3 takedown notices for 3 posts in 1 year, and consider it's enough to delete all the stuff that I had stored there. I'm totally disappointed (devastated actually) and think I've had enough of these storage problem (first Mediafire, then Rapidshare, and now Mega). So this is the end. I know several other musical blogs use Mega or Zippyshare and had not their accounts deleted, but maybe I'm not cautious enough in the material I post. Anyway, I'm fed up with this cat and mouse play. Since I don't want to leave posts with dead links, I'll remove the blog from the web. Hard to see 8 years of work (the blog started in August 2009) destroyed but I think there'll be soon no place for free sharing on the web, except for those who are familiar enough with the ways to use alternative modalities (I don't want to use torrents). But personally, I'm too old for that now. If you have a sort of solution to propose, for example a filehoster that does not obey like a watchdog to the companies that earn money with delation (like webcapio, who did the bad job in my case, go to hell fuckers), don't hesitate to give it to me in comments whilst the blog is still active. Maybe it'll make me change my mind. Sad it ends since I had a lot fantastic stuff to post in the near future. But free (in its double acception) is less and less a word that has to do with internet (no tits, no free music...). Thanx to all those who left me nice comments during this 8 yrs long adventure, and the musicians that were kind enough to let me share their music freely (thinking of Mark Perry, one of my all-time hero). I'm sure they understood that the way I did it was for helping their work to stay alive, and not to rob them. Note that many of my stuff (improved sounding live material and nice DIY cover sleeves) are sold legally on the net by cupid MP3 sites and nothing is done to stop them. In this capitalistic world, the moneymakers are working hand in hand, the only enemies are us, the free-sharing-activists.

8/21/17

Buzzcocks - It's Not You 7" (2014)

We had to wait 7 years before new stuff by the band was released. It was a LP called The Way and I was proud and glad to have participated to it's release via some money given by The Pledge. The album was all we could hope from a band whose members are in their 60's and who maintain the name of Buzzcocks with honour and the rather weak notes you can see on its wikipedia page is nothing less than bullshit by second-hand rock critics. The album was released during the summer of 2014 and this single only in November. If this is actually my favorite song from the album, it's not really calibrated to be a hit and it was not. I'm not sure the band was expecting any success anyway but maybe to add a great song to their fantastic repertoire. It shows how  Pete Shelley can still write seminal songs. And this one is really one of this kind. The bridge is in particular a real killer.  Note that there's "(radio mix)" added to the title of the single. Since I took this version from the clip, I hope it's the good version but I think so. On the B-side, a Steve Diggle non-album track called "Generation Suicide". A rather common rocker but pleasant anyway. Catch it here or there. Still 2 more to come.

8/17/17

Buzzcocks - Reconciliation EP (2007)



















Released in December 2007, i.e., more than 18 months after it's paired LP (Flat Pack Philosophy), the reason of this song being issued in a single format is not very clear since it's far from being a potential hit, at least for me. Anyway, the reason this EP is interesting is, as always, for its B-side, consisting of two Steve Diggle's songs, again much more in a solo vein than related to Buzzcocks. Not bad but rather dispensable. The Who/Jam influence (we'll say "mods") is very pregnant but this is not a surprise with this composer. Some more to come. Meanwhile catch this one here or there.


8/11/17

Buzzcocks - Sell You Everything EP (2006)


















In August 2006, 11 years from now, the band released their usual second single driven from the current album (it was Flat Pack Philosophy). And as usual, since the first was a Pete Shelley composition, the second was a Steve Diggle's. Ans as often, it was a very very good song, almost a classic based upon my own standards, and it would have deserve, as "Sick City Sometimes", to be a hit but unfortunately it was not, and didn't enter the charts as did it's predecessor. The B-side is often the one that stimulates interest of the fan in search of non-album tracks. It's the case here but the load is rather deceiving since the first one is a live version of "Sixteen" dating from 6 years earlier (2000) and captured in a unlocated US concert. The sound is poor and the version doesn't add to the band's glory. The second song will surprise any Buzzcocks fan since it's a Steve Diggle's ballad that shows how he's in the steps of Pete Townshend (with the voice of John Entwistle) and even Paul Weller. Not bad but rather out of place on a Buzzcocks EP. All the more that the song was a leftover from the Modern LP sessions recorded 10 years earlier, so what was the need to release it on this EP this is a good question. Interesting to catch here anyway or there.


8/6/17

Buzzcocks - I Wish I Never Loved You EP (2006)

Three years after their eponymous LP, the band released in February 2006 this single as a trailer for their new LP Flat-Pack Philosophy. Weirdly, and although the chosen song is far to be a classic, it charted (only at 146 it's true, but it charted, first time since Part 1 in 1980). On the B-side of the EP, two non-album songs. First the Diggle's"Don't Matter What You Say", unfortunately once again not a recent one but from 1996, surely again a leftover of the All Set album. But since the song is rather good, we won't complain too much. Then "Orion", much better, one of this Shelley's oblique and dark songs we love so much. Sad it doesn't last more, the sudden end is clearly premature and wastes some of the pleasure of provided by this song. All in all, another winner for a band that never released an uninteresting EP since its reformation. More to come. Catch it here or there.


7/22/17

Buzzcocks - Sick City Sometimes (2003)




















Six months after the first track driven from their eponymous album ("Jerk", previous post), the band released another EP with what I consider as one of their best song ever, "Sick City Sometimes", composed and sung by Steve Diggle and that would have been a massive hit if it had been released by one of the adulated band of the times (don't remember who were). But it was not. Too bad. On the B-side, there's a non-album track but unfortunately, it's not from the session of the current album but from 1995 (maybe the All Set sessions). And the song (from Shelley) is rather weak and dispendable. The last song is the unavoidable live track, this time recorded in 1999 (don't ask me why) but I've no more info about it (maybe I should have a look to the biography but I'm too lazy tonight). Since the song is "Paradise", it's interesting. But stop the babble now and catch this EP here.


7/21/17

Buzzcocks - Jerk EP (2003)

Strangely, there will be an almost 10 year gap between the Libertine Angel and the Jerk EP although 2 full album would be released (the great All Set in 1996 and the more deceiving Modern in 1999). Some singles and EPs were actually released, but only live tracks, promo singles or uneven semi-official ones. But with the abrasive self-titled album released in 2003, the band would issue again EPs with non-album tracks (demos or live songs). The first was "Jerk", the opening song from the LP. The line-up was the same than 10 years before but the energy and aggressivity were more the ones of the 1980-81 era than the ones they had shown after their reformation. The song had everything necessary to find its way in the charts (a flavour of "Everybody's Happy", even with the drumming bridge) but times were surely not ready to make this sort of fast and furious love song a hit. What's interesting is that the EP allows us to hear a non-album song, Diggle's "Don't Come Back", not a great one but as often with the man, the song is pleasant to hear and provides this energy spark that is sometimes cruelly missing elsewhere. The choice of the live song is rather strange, "Oh Shit" being an old punk tune that wouldn't help the band to put its past away. Recorded (badly) at Toulouse in 2000 and final song of the concert, I would like to know what was the reason of this choice but I surely will never have the answer. So here's this new Buzzcocks load. Another one tomorrow.


7/6/17

Buzzcocks - Libertine Angel EP (1994)





















In their series of postreformation EPs this one, released in April 1994, is quite special since it is not linked to any album, maybe because the band believed in the chart potential of "Libertine Angel". I'm not sure they were right and facts showed that they were wrong. Not that the song is weak but it was a little too much complicated to gain attention of a large audience. They even shot a video for it (see below, sorry for 24 seconds of countdown, those who uploaded the clip could have cut it) like they had done for "Do It", don't forget it was the MTV era (not for long actually) and every band had to make a visual support for their singles (although most of them were poor and not pleasant to look at now). On the B-side of the EP, there were 2 new songs, the raw, rough and rude Diggle's "Roll It Over" and a curious instrumental based on a sort of movie soundtrack (real or fake I don't know). Sound like a musical support for a scene of action in a blockbuster. Interesting although not essential. Catch all this here.

7/3/17

Buzzcocks - Do It EP (1993)




















In August 1993, 4 months after the Trade Test Transmissions LP was released (but failed to chart), another single was issued with "Do It" as A-side. Note that the version is not the album one, and has been remixed in a way that we honestly can say today that it was very bad (this phasing on the voice is horripilous). Surely it fitted better with the current sound (we're in the post Madchester year) but not at all with Buzzcocks. Fortunately, the song is backed on the EP version with 2 non-album tracks, strangely recorded live (and never issued, to my knowledge) in a studio version. Tony Barber says, in the inner sheets of the Trade Test Transmissions 2004 re-issue, that they were recorded during a sound check at the Amsterdam Paradiso, but it's dubious since their 1993 concert at the Paradiso was in October 1993, 3 months after the EP was released. Thus, the mystery is complete. If this EP is precious, it's for the Steve Diggle song, "Trash Away", showing the roughest side of the band, not far from Clash or Stiff Little Fingers, with a vicious and oblique riff, a sinister vocal tone and violently depressive and angry lyrics. Since it was not on Youtube, I decided to create a clip with famous Lewis Hines' pictures of children at work in the first half of XXth century in the US. The sound is not perfect but it gives the song a sort of enhanced authenticity. A real forgotten gem. Listening to Buzzcocks these late weeks convinces me that Steve Diggle is not far to be Shelley's pair in quality of composition. So do... oops catch it here. Above and just below are the sleeves of the vinyl EP and below of the CD EP.





7/2/17

Buzzcocks - Innocent EP (1993)



















Sorry for the delay but I was getting married so I think it's an excuse you will accept. So back to the post-reformation Buzzcocks EP series. Tonight, it's the second one, more successful than the first, issued 2 years later, and much better too. The EP featured 2 Pete Shelley tracks of their to-be-released first post-reformation LP (the excellent Trade Test Transmission) and a non-album Steve Diggle one ("Inside") which is the main interest of this post if you have the LP in its original version (since Castel re-released it with the non-album single tracks on it in 2004). Released in May 1993, one month prior to the LP was issued, the single would have deserved to chart high but failed to (as almost all the singles and EPs the band would release after they reunited). But here is a good opportunity to put these 3 great forgotten songs under the blogspot light. Catch it here. More to come (very soon this time).


6/20/17

Buzzcocks - Alive Tonight EP (1991)




















This is the first post of a series about all the singles or EPs Buzzcocks have released after they reformed in 1989. Don't imagine their comeback was a path paved with roses. Actually there were more thorns than petals. In 1989, everybody was expecting a major failure but their live sets seemed to deny this black prediction. However time was passing and no new material was recorded, leading most to the idea the band would become one of these pathetic bands that capitalize on their past and do not bring anything new, sort of nostalgia formation (after all they had a song entitled "Nostalgia"). In November 1990 and February 1991, they recorded demos for a putative album that would  never be, with a certain Paul Roberts producing. But the band was unhappy with the production and listening to this EP (issued in April 1991), the first thing they released after reformation and featuring 4 songs from these sessions, we can only agree with them. Sure the influence of the madchester scene deeply influenced the band that is hardly the one that everybody remembered. Everything here is flabby and energy lacking. Note that on drums there was Mike Joyce, ex-Smiths and no more John Maher, Steve Garvy being still on bass. The drumming is actually much more Smithian than Buzzcocksian. The songs "Alive Tonight" and "Last To Know" would be re-recorded later in a much more satisfying version and included in the Trade Test Transmission LP 2 years later. This first EP would go completely unnoticed and it's a good thing since it's not impossible that the band would have chosen to stick to this "modern" (and now dated) sound if it has found its public. Catch it here.