8/17/17

Buzzcocks - Reconciliation EP (2007)



















Released in December 2007, i.e., more than 18 months after it's paired LP (Flat Pack Philosophy), the reason of this song being issued in a single format is not very clear since it's far from being a potential hit, at least for me. Anyway, the reason this EP is interesting is, as always, for its B-side, consisting of two Steve Diggle's songs, again much more in a solo vein than related to Buzzcocks. Not bad but rather dispensable. The Who/Jam influence (we'll say "mods") is very pregnant but this is not a surprise with this composer. Some more to come. Meanwhile catch this one here.


8/11/17

Buzzcocks - Sell You Everything EP (2006)


















In August 2006, 11 years from now, the band released their usual second single driven from the current album (it was Flat Pack Philosophy). And as usual, since the first was a Pete Shelley composition, the second was a Steve Diggle's. Ans as often, it was a very very good song, almost a classic based upon my own standards, and it would have deserve, as "Sick City Sometimes", to be a hit but unfortunately it was not, and didn't enter the charts as did it's predecessor. The B-side is often the one that stimulates interest of the fan in search of non-album tracks. It's the case here but the load is rather deceiving since the first one is a live version of "Sixteen" dating from 6 years earlier (2000) and captured in a unlocated US concert. The sound is poor and the version doesn't add to the band's glory. The second song will surprise any Buzzcocks fan since it's a Steve Diggle's ballad that shows how he's in the steps of Pete Townshend (with the voice of John Entwistle) and even Paul Weller. Not bad but rather out of place on a Buzzcocks EP. All the more that the song was a leftover from the Modern LP sessions recorded 10 years earlier, so what was the need to release it on this EP this is a good question. Interesting to catch here anyway.


8/6/17

Buzzcocks - I Wish I Never Loved You EP (2006)

Three years after their eponymous LP, the band released in February 2006 this single as a trailer for their new LP Flat-Pack Philosophy. Weirdly, and although the chosen song is far to be a classic, it charted (only at 146 it's true, but it charted, first time since Part 1 in 1980). On the B-side of the EP, two non-album songs. First the Diggle's"Don't Matter What You Say", unfortunately once again not a recent one but from 1996, surely again a leftover of the All Set album. But since the song is rather good, we won't complain too much. Then "Orion", much better, one of this Shelley's oblique and dark songs we love so much. Sad it doesn't last more, the sudden end is clearly premature and wastes some of the pleasure of provided by this song. All in all, another winner for a band that never released an uninteresting EP since its reformation. More to come. Catch it here.